How Justice is Served, with Jed Kurzban
How Justice is Served, with Jed Kurzban

Episode · 4 months ago

Meet Jed Kurzban

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Who is Jed Kurzban? Why did he decide to become an attorney? Who does he help, and how does he evaluate their situation? Hear answers to these questions and more, in this first episode of the How Justice Is Served podcast! 

Welcome to the how justice to servepodcast with attorney Jed curs ban if you're practicing attorney or abusiness person who needs to persuade others when the stakes are high. Thisis the podcast for you, whether you stand in the court room or the BoardRoom Jed will teach you how to persuade people when it really matters. Listenas JEDD shares, keen insights life, lessons and memorable stories alldelivered with a dose of humor. Here's your host Jed Kursten! Well, I'm joining today by dead Curzan.He is the author of how justice is served, and so jetted is so great tosit down with you and talk, even though it is virtual. All about your book howJustice is served, it's great to talk with you today. I do want to kind of get a little bit of your backstory and talk a little bit about that, and so I was wondering you know: howdid how would you describe you and and what you do sure was very nice to meetyou as well. I will tell you I am...

...kid from Miami local at practice inMiami Florida. I was very lucky that I was the son of a lawyer. My father wasan attorney, and so I grew up watching my father, who had some pretty largetrials and was pretty well known in his own right, and so when I was a youngboy and saw what my father did and how he helped people I wanted to helppeople. I wanted to be part of that, and so I went away for college and cameback to the university Miami for Law School. Knowing I wanted to practice inMiami where I grew up, and I wanted to find a way to really use my skills tohelp people, then my skills generally have been that I'm very good atunderstanding people, I'm a regular guy. You know play ball and go to the beachand grow up here and juries are like me and I'm like juries, and I think someone deserves help. A jury is going to think some of deserves out, and so Iwanted to be part of that system to...

...help people, because I saw a privateindustry is about profit, making money and that's okay, but they're, not abouthelping people, and unfortunately our government isn't really about helpingpeople. It doesn't do what it needs to do forcatastrophically injured people, and so when I saw people that werecatastrophically injured, blind, paralyzed, unable to speak, unable to functionbecause their kidneys have been destroyed and they have kidneytransplanting battle, rejection or heart disease and was untreated ormisdiagnosed. I wanted to be a part of that, and so the bulk of what I do isto help these catastrophically injure people, mostly in Medical Maltrata, why medical about practice isinterested. I I love the cerebral nature of dealingwith these physicians and doctors and science. It's something that reallyattracted me early on. I was lucky...

...enough, as I said, to have a father andwho was an attorney, and he let me find my path. I was a public defender for alittle bit in law school. I didn't really want to be part of the criminalsystem and I feel like I was really helping people. I did some family lawcases again. I don't feel like. I was really helpingpeople that was just part of a system that sort of turned. I did somepersonal injury work to enjoyed. It was smaller end automobile accident, and then I got my first medicalpractice case and really enjoyed sparring with the doctor. Seeing howthis doctor made these mistakes hold him accountable, because doctorsgenerally tend to defend themselves very diveenity. They don't they don'tlike to admit they made mistakes. You know and a little bit like in a caraccident case. If you were in someone to say I'm sorry, you know I getdistracted. I Apologize. Here's my insurance they'll, take care of thedamage. Right, doesn't work that way in...

...medical, not practice. These insurancecompanies will spend literally millions of dollars to fight to not have to payto prove a point that they're not going to give these injured victims any money.I fought cases for seven eight years. I have spent two to three hundredthousand dollars in cases, and I know they spent double a triple what I'vespent to fight me and it really bothers me that sort of this bottomlesscheckbook of insurance companies gets to really destroy these little peoplewho are injured through no fault of their own, and I thought they didn'thave a really solid champion for them, and I wanted to be that champion andthat's what led to my book. My Book is about, as I say in my book, the DavidFighting, the Golias right. I've always related to that story. It's part ofwhat I believe. As I started in my book. You know I had my own difficulties andwanted to overcome them and tried very hard to make sure anyone that is put inthis position, where they're being sort...

...of bullied, yeah believe by the time ittakes to bully by the money. They'll spend bullied by the horrendous actionsthese insurance companies will take, and these defense lawyers will take-and I wanted to defend them and it started as an early age. When I was,you know, a wrestler in high school and I hated bullies and I would walk aroundand try to protect some of the smaller kids from bullies, because it justbothered me and it bothers me today. Well, I wanted to ask you: was thereanything in particular in your childhood? You know growing up with adad that was an attorney. was there anything that happened whenyou were a kid that made you think? Okay, this is what I want to do when Igrow up. I want to follow in my dad's footsteps, so I talked about it in mybook. There's a trial that I remember very well. He was actually an iron worker. He wasbuilding buildings and making sure buildings are safe. That's what ironworkers do it's a really hard job and the owner's son, the owner of a hugeconstruction company's son, was playing...

...around and he went into a crane anddropped a thousand pound wreck and ball sixty feet into the air down the fromthe air down to the ground and crush the sin workers foot my father sued,the company. I must have been in college then orjust starting law school. I think, and I was down for the trial either wasbreak or I was here and the day of trial. They admittedliability, so they admitted they were wrong, butit took two years before they admit they were wrong and hundreds ofthousands of dollars they'd sent investigators to harass this man. Theywere pretty terrible, the insurance company and in the end they said, yeah.Okay, it's our fault, but it s a crushed foot. It's not that big a deal.You know if you were better shoes, maybe this thousand pounds o men ball.We don't have destroyed his foot. Maybe it's his fault. You don't have to giveus so much money, and so, at the end of...

...the trial, close an argument. My fathercame and said to the jury in a very matter of fact way. The Way I am aswell, it was dad with they're wrong and they justdon't want to pay. They say they were wrong. They say, they've destroyed thisman's life and all they want to do is give him pennies and he threw like ahundred pennies in the air and they were shining in the light and slammingall over the bar all in in front of the jury. It was awesome that I was in theback watching these pennies glitter, and I thought this just awesome I wantin and then I talked about the judge because they don't really liketheatrics. Most of these judges screamed at my father M Erman pickthose putties up right now. My father turned to me and said pick up penniesand I was on my hands and knees for like ten minutes, picking up penniesall over the court room thinking. This is just the best. I can't wait to dothis and he's in my pocket that I picking up- and it was great- and I was-I was hooked from that day and knew I...

...wanted to be a trial attorney. I lovethat that's cool and now for you personally, when you're practicing lawand when you're approached by a client kind of what are those things that youlook for in a client and they help maybe help you evaluate. Okay, is thisperson just an Angulis Chaser, or is this truly something that I need totake on? What are the things that you evaluate about a client? So there are three things that I thinkseparate me from most attorneys number one I do all my own ing takes. I don'thave a staff talk to my clients beforehand. I don't push them off tosome agency to do it. I do it. They put a call in my office. They get me Jedcurs man and I speak to them and if I think they sound like they have a realproblem, they're, not fishing for answers or not saying you know a buddyof mine told me: I get a million dollars. If I call a lawyer, if Ireally think they're hurt, then I will, you know, see them and talk to them andstart to review their case number one. That makes me different than ninetypercent of lawyers that exist in the...

...country number two. When I meet with them and Isee them regular guy, you know I was not born afancy. I don't have anything special about me had to work hard to get towhere I am and I'm just like a jury, and if I like that person, the jurywill like that person, and if I don't like that person, I don't want them asa client because a jury won't like them. You know that's my number two and thennumber three. I do a very extensive review of the records I make surethey're truly hurt. I make sure that they can document all the problems.I've had that they're not just sort of making it up they're, not lingeringthey're, not pretending they're, not going in and saying you know, there'sthe worst band on a man. It's a ten out of ten and the next day say: Oh, no,I'm fine, it's not so bad. I want to see that day or consistent in theircomplaints and they're really hurt after that. Those three steps. If Ithink it's a good case I'll take the case well, I love hearing that that howyou are so thorough and diligent and...

...making sure that you're taking care ofyour clients and that they are truly in in need of help and that's what you'reabout so I so appreciate the chance to talk with you and I would reallyencourage everyone to go and pick up a copy of your book. It's how justice isserve it's by Jad, curs band. Thank you. So much for spending part of your daywith me appreciate it. Thank you very much. I'm a good day thanks for listening to the how justicethis serve podcast with Jed Cursin, learn more or get a copy of Jed's bookwhen you reach out to him that K, K, t p Law Com, that's K, K, P, P law, com e.

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